Teenagers in UK not being able to access sanitary products?

Despite the on and off stigma of periods and talking about them that you grow up with if you are a vagina bearer, periods are still a thing that half of the population get and cannot just turn off at the switch of a button. Everybody’s periods are different – they can range in how long they’re around for, how heavy they are, different intensity of period cramps, different period symptoms/PMS to go alongside it and the time between them can be different too. But almost every person with a menstrual cycle invests in some sort of sanitary product. Whether it’s towels, tampons, reusable cloth pads, menstrual cups etc. etc. It’s a necessity to bring comfort, hygiene and peace of mind to the person on their period. So how come access to sanitary products is starting to become harder for school girls in Leeds?

It’s not the first people have heard of teenagers missing out on education or school because of their body’s natural cycle. In rural Uganda girls miss around eight days of school due to lack of resources, in Garissa, Kenya 86% report missing school due to periods and in India 23% of girls drop out when they start menstruating. Isn’t that crazy? Girls/young people with vaginas should not miss out on getting an education just because of how their body works. Nobody chooses to have a period, right? This kind of problem is slowly creeping up on our doorstep! It’s been reported recently that in Britain, specifically Leeds, students are relying on their teachers to provide sanitary products or not coming to school at all during their period. Some of the students approached in this research explained they come from families maybe with a single parent or multiple siblings and when short on money it can be hard to get the sanitary products needed when they are on their periods.

I found this news quite sad because like I mentioned, nobody chooses to have a period and it must be quite upsetting to get into trouble for attendance when it’s just your body doing what it’s meant to do! So I decided I wanted to do something, even if it’s just blog posts to raise awareness, or get people talking more about periods and sanitary products, or try and raise some money to send off products to charities that specialize in providing people who have limited or no access to products with said products!

Today I put up a survey on my Facebook asking people to fill in a couple of questions that cover how many products you use on one period, have you ever found yourself in a place where you’ve had to makeshift something when you’re bleeding and can’t access a product, what age did you start requiring them and such. I got such a good response back, I’m so unbelievably happy and surprised! I hope to write a blogpost tomorrow, properly going over the numbers but so far I’ve noticed one common pattern – everybody agrees people should have access to free sanitary products and almost everyone feels like their high school didn’t do much to provide access to products/feel comfortable asking. Which made me kind of sad but more determined to start a discussion.

My survey is here to fill in! It’s only 10 questions and any response is useful! 

So what do I plan to try and do? Well tomorrow/Monday I will write up properly my findings on it! As well as that I’m trying to contact some local organisations that take in donations of pads/sanitary products for tips on raising awareness! Watch this space!
Thank you for reading,

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Confession: I don’t know how to use jelly pots

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I might act like a bit of a know-it-all about Lush sometimes. There has been one or two occasions where I’ve dragged my boyfriend or a family member into Lush with me and given them talks about items they’re looking at and even recommended stuff to them. (If recommending is basically stuffing a colourful bath bomb in my overwhelmed boyfriend’s face and going ‘SMELL THIS’). I feel if I had a lot more confidence and was extroverted I could maybe even ace a job at Lush; advising Lush fanatics on our new products or what gift boxes people should buy family and friends based on said gift receivers personality or likes, mainly cause I believe Lush’s ideas and products have a lot of personality in each creation. There are some things I’d suggest to different friends and so on. Friend who likes nature, floral smells and is very gentle and calm? I’d definitely get them a Tisty Tosty bath bomb. Friend who hasn’t used Lush stuff before and you want to show them the amazing colours and swirls their bath bombs can produce? They should start with a Dragon’s Egg bath bomb or an Intergalactic bomb – both produce an amazing palette of colours and entertain you with the patterns they go through as they fizz up in your bath.

But I have to admit now there is one product, in my 7 years of using Lush products, that I still don’t know how to use properly. Shower jellies.

People’s favourite product to poke when they visit a store. The jellies are wonderfully smelling and coloured tubs of, well, jelly that you can use to clean both body and hair. I have owned quite a few tubs of Sweetie Pie and Whoosh shower jelly in the past but each time I have one I feel like I use the product completely wrong. I’ll be stood there in the shower staring down this tub of wobbly jelly wondering the best way to go about it. I’ve been told just to pick a bit off and rub that on myself, other tips have been to turn the shower off and use it or just use the whole blob and wash myself with it. But I’ve yet to find a way in which I think I’m getting the full benefit of the jelly. Whenever I wash with it I’m always dropping it and having it slip out of my hands. Bits and bits of jelly end up on the floor of my shower and I feel like they are bits of jelly gone to waste but is that what is meant to happen? All in all, the products smell amazing and are a really fun idea, however I’m totally naive to how to use these properly. Is it just me?

Thanks for reading! Please comment and share!

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